Fujifilm GFX50s and Sony A7RII detail

Comparison using a 100% crop from two headshots made during the same shoot.

I did a headshot session for a young man the other day. There was an opportunity to use both the Fujifilm GFX50s with its 120mm F4 lens and a Sony A7RII with its 24-70mm F2.8 GM lens.

The subject was lit with a Cheetah CL360x in a Westcott Apollo Octa. Fill was with another CL360x in a Westcott Apollo strip box. The hair/kicker was an Flashpoint eVOLV200. They were all controlled in M mode via a Sony variant XT1 on the A7RII and a Nikon variant XT1 on the GFX50s.

Both cameras were set to their x sync speed, F8, ISO 400.

I cropped the GFX50s image to 900 pixels with the subject’s right eye centered. I then cropped the A7RII image to the same visual size which resulted in a pixel length of 657. A combination of sensor size, pixel density and the lens focal length combined to create the difference in pixel length per side to create the same visual area.

Here is the A7RII image with no sharpening applied by Lightroom:

Here is the A7RII image with Lightroom default sharpening applied:

Amount 25, Radius 1.0, Detail 25, Mask 0.

Here is the A7RII image with what looked to me to be optimal Lightroom sharpening applied:

Amount 27, Radius .9, Detail 36, Mask 0.

 

Here is the GFX50s image with no sharpening applied by Lightroom:

Here is the GFX50s image with Lightroom default sharpening applied:

Amount 25, Radius 1.0, Detail 25, Mask 0.

Here is the GFX50s image with what looked to me to be optimal Lightroom sharpening applied:

Amount 21, Radius .9, Detail 50, Mask 0.

 

Applying the sharpening setting that I consider optimal was done by looking at the cropped area on a calibrated monitor at 1:1 and using the Option key while moving the sliders to better see the impact each has on sharpening. I followed the workflow logic of starting with Amount and working down to Mask. I then fine tuned them until arriving at a sharpened image without any obvious artifacts.

Given the native GFX50s file size and cropping for this headshot (5000 x 5000) this 100 % crop is equivalent to looking at a 16.66 inch print using 300 pixels per inch for the printing resolution. I shot this project loose to ensure maximum cropping options. A 16 inch print will be greater than life sized.

The A7RII impressed me with its detail and sharpness until I got the GFX50s with the 120mm lens. When I was a young photographer my favorite portrait camera was a Hasselblad 500 with the 150mm F4 lens using Tri X and Ektachrome film.

I think I’ve found the digital equivalent.